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Category: surveillance state

Labour’s Last Chance?

The Labour leadership contest, whose result is announced today, is of far more importance than many Labour supporters and MPs may realise.  Not only is it a huge opportunity for Labour to demonstrate that it is relevant to the UK electorate and has a clear message of what it stands for but it is also the last chance Labour may have of proving itself capable and/or deserving of remaining a major political presence.

Recent events involving the party and contest suggest that it doesn’t have a Scooby Doo about the importance of the contest for the future of the party.

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Tinfoil Hats Anyone?

The recent revelations exposed by Edward Snowden about the NSA’s PRISM scheme may have shocked many people.  Sadly they did not shock me.  What the NSA decides to do is its own business, but the revelations that GCHQ is engaged in a mass wiretapping scheme of its own show that the UK government is either complicit in a surveillance society or utterly clueless.

William Hague’s claim that “If you are innocent you have nothing to fear” is the kind of thing that comes straight out of 1984, Fahrenheit 451 or other works of that ilk.  Of course, the news that Ian Livingston, the BT CEO and exec who authorised the illegal and secret tests of Phorm’s technology on over 20,000 BT Internet customers is now to work as a government advisor shows that if you’re the right kind of criminal, you can get a job in high places.  The Spectator asks some questions that Mr Hague needed to answer in the House of Commons.

Continue reading Tinfoil Hats Anyone?